If you’re looking for a new perspective on the news, read a few stories from PressTV, Iran’s press outlet that heeds “the often neglected voices and perspectives of a great portion of the world.”

Here are a few sentences from their reports:

… The [Afghan] war, which, according to January opinion surveys, is opposed by more than half of the American people, is nearing its ninth year, having killed many thousands of Afghan civilians and yet short of bringing any sign of stability to the war-torn country…

… The US attacked Iraq under the pretext that Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction, but an official CIA report in 2005 confirmed that there were no such weapons in the country…

… The prominent American academician [Noam Chomsky] also took aim at the double-standards that US policy-makers employ towards the three nations that did not ratify the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty, namely Israel, India and Pakistan.

The United States provided these three nations with the nuclear technology, in violation of the UN Security Council resolutions. All these nations have built nuclear weapons, with Israel, which is in possession of more than 200 nuclear warheads in the Middle East region…

I could quibble with the presentation of these facts. Yes, things have gotten worse, not better in Afghanistan, but things weren’t that great under the Taliban either. “Pretext” is a strong word that implies deceit — while many would use that terminology, many others would argue that the U.S. and many other nations did truly believe that Iraq possessed WMDs. And regarding nuclear weapons, the U.S. did not necessarily provide nuclear know-how to all three of those nations. (I’d guess that North Korea gave it to Pakistan.) And, of course, no one has ever confirmed that Israel has 200 nuclear warheads — but they probably do.

Still, I’m sure that an average Iranian reading the New York Times would see a similar frame. Certain facts pointed out and others ignored. And some facts that may not be totally supported with empirical evidence.

So, where do we go from here? Not sure, but reading Iran’s news is probably a good start.