Here’s a site, Truthout.org, that presents the far-left view that the media are actually a conservative organ, controlled by corporate interests. Here’s a representative post which begins:

Ongoing military operations continue unabated in al-Anbar province. With names like ‘Operation Iron Fist’ and ‘Operation Iron Gate’ which was launched just days after ‘Iron Fist,’ thousands of US troops, backed by warplanes, tanks and helicopters, began attacking small cities and villages primarily in the northwestern area of al-Anbar.

According to the US military and corporate media, the purpose of these operations is to “root out” fighters from al-Qaida in Iraq, along with so-called insurgents.

An Iraqi journalist writing under the name Sabah Ali (due to concerns of retribution from US/Iraqi governmental authorities) recently returned from the al-Qa’im area of Iraq. Her report tells quite a different story.

Several points. First off, I can’t imagine that anyone thinks the “corporate media” is actually presenting a favorable impression of what’s going on in Iraq. All I read everyday is a death toll with no context representing the overall progress. My view is shared by numerous military bloggers who feel the press is doing an incredibly poor job representing Iraq. But, according to Truthout, the media are not doing enough to express what a dishonorable job the military is doing in Iraq.

Secondly, what is the real purpose of these attacks if not to “root out” fighters? Does this author imply that the American military’s real purpose is to kill innocent people?

Thirdly, why use the term “so-called insurgents”? Hell, I think we should call them terrorists; “insurgents” is supposed to be the neutral noun. What would this author like them to be called? Freedom fighters?

Maybe we’re both suffering from the Hostile Media Effect, perceiving the media as biased against our own views. However, the latest Gallup survey found many more respondents perceived the media to be biased toward liberal views rather than conservative thinking. Of course, few people read about that survey — which helps make my point.